SilverStone AP182 Test and Review

Before I start with the article I believe it will be nice to say a few words about the whole series and all of the models included.

The Air Penetrator is a series which was added to the SilverStone portfolio a few years ago with the classic AP121 and later expanded with additional models, offering the unique channeling technology, made to focus the airflow into a column behind the propeller so that it can be channeled through various obstacles inside every modern case for more efficient cooling performance. Now the AP series offers seven models, a few of which I’ve already tested in the past with dimensions of:

  1. SilverStone AP121 (120mm x 25mm) – working at maximum speed of 1500 rpm with airflow level of 35.36CFM and static pressure of 1.71mmH2O at noise level of 22.4 dB(A).
  2. SilverStone AP121-L (120mm x 25mm) – working at maximum speed of  1500 rpm with airflow level of 35.36CFM and static pressure of 1.71mmH2O at noise level of 22.4 dB(A), offering 4 types of backlight – Red, Green, White and Blue.
  3. SilverStone AP122 (120mm x 25mm) – working at maximum speed of 1200 rpm with airflow level of 42.58 CFM and static pressure of 1.05mmH2O at noise level of 19.7dBA.
  4. SilverStone AP123 (120mm x 25mm) – working at maximum speed of 1500 rpm with airflow level of 31.4 CFM and static pressure of 1.21mmH2O at noise level of 31.4dBA.
  5. SilverStone AP141 (140mm x 25mm) – working at maximum speed of 1500 rpm with airflow level of 64.34 CFM and static pressure of 1.55 mmH2O at noise level of 30.1dBA.
  6. SilverStone AP181 (180mm x 25mm) – working at maximum speed of 1200 rpm with airflow level of 130 CFM and static pressure of 2.45mmH2O at noise level of 34dBA.
  7. SilverStone AP182 (180mm x 25mm) – working at maximum speed of 2000 rpm with airflow level of 170 CFM and static pressure of 6.10mmH2O at noise level of 34dBA.

Now let’s check what SilverStone AP182 has to offer to me and all of the regular users worldwide.

IMG_8228

SilverStone AP182 was provided to me in the pretty standard for the series huge and very stylish carton box, painted in black/grey colour scheme with a big picture of the fan in the middle of the front panel, some of the major technical details related to the product and a small picture of the included in the package fan controller, about which I will definitely talk a bit later.

IMG_8229

Of course, the full technical details related to the product are explained in several languages on the back side of the carton box, giving us a nice and clean vision of what we can expect from the product. As you probably saw on the picture above, I’ve already taken one of the two samples out of the package and I am really eager to check what this model can do for me and my hardware.

Now let’s check the fan itself and this is what the fan looks like at first sight:

IMG_8234

SilverStone AP182 is made of pretty standard for the series but still very massive and strong  square 180mm frame, entirely painted in white, of course featuring the channeling design, made to focus the airflow in a column behind the propeller. The frame itself is made to be installed only on 180mm case fan slot, which unfortunately is not used a lot by the case manufacturers worldwide. Anyway, I have SilverStone RAVEN RV03 which I’ve already tested in the past and it will be nice to check how the two SilverStone AP182 test samples operate with this case.

IMG_8243

After I took a quick look of the frame the first thing I noticed is that there are 2 cables coming out of the frame which are:

  1. A very long sleeved in white 3-wire cable with a 3-pin connector, which made me think that this model is especially made to be installed on the front side of the case and to be powered and regulated directly from the motherboard.  And I believe now is the moment to warn every user, who has decided or will decide to buy this model, that the fan requires from 0.05A (0.6W) (low speed mode) to 1.3A (15,6W) (high speed mode) which is actually a lot and I should say never connect two of these to one fan connector on the motherboard before checking if it can handle up to 30W. 
  2. The second cable is actually much shorter, of course sleeved in white and is made so the external fan controller can be attached directly to the fan.

IMG_8239

And this is what the external fan controller looks like when it is attached to the fan itself:

IMG_8251

The fan controller is actually just a small potentiometer attached with two small screws to a metal bracket, which should be installed on a PCI explansion slot on the back of the case. The bracket itself is made to offer the possibility for two potentiometers to be installed and save one PCI expansion slot on the case if there are two of these fans. Of course the cable between the fan and the fan controller is again sleeved in white and is much longer than the regular for powering the fan so it can reach anywhere the back of the case.

So far I’ve spoken only about the frame and the additional fan controller and I believe I should pay some attention to the propeller itself.

SilverStone AP182 is supplied with a propeller featuring seven, again painted in white, very wide, very massive and sharp blades with really aggressive angle and design made to provide maximum airflow level without sacrificing the noise level, a lot. If this is true, we will find out a bit later. In fact the purpose of this fan, as every other model from the AP series with this structure is to be installed on the front side of the case and cool everything to the back of the case.

The connection between the frame and the propeller is done via two ball bearings.

After I’ve checked the structure of the fan, I believe I should say a few words about the additional accessories included in the package.

IMG_8247

The standard package for the SilverStone AP182 offers:

  1. Four screws for mounting the fan on a 180mm case fan slot
  2. A molex to 3-pin adapter, so the fan can be powered directly from the power supply
  3. A fan controller with PCI bracket for manually controlling the fan
  4. A plug to be connected if the external fan controller is not used

Now let’s do some testing:

SilverStone AP182 is one really massive case fan, which unfortunately I can’t really test using my standard setup and for that reason I’ve decided to do slightly different tests including my rig, which is:

Testing rig:

CPU: AMD Vishera FX-8350

  1. At standard frequency 4.020 MHz (at 1.356V)
  2. At medium overclock frequency of 4.420 MHz (at 1.416V)

Motherboard: GigaByte 990FXA-UD3

Video card: Sapphire 5830 Extreme 1GB DDR5 256bit

Memory: 2 x 4GB Geil Black Dragon 1866 MHz

Hard drive: Kingston SSD SV100S264G

Case: SilverStone Raven RV-03

Power supply: Antec HCP-750W

Cooler: Noctua NH-U12S

Thermal paste: Gelid GC-Supreme

Standard fans installed:

The tests were conducted in a closed system with:

  1. 120mm fan on the top panel taking hot air out and spinning at about 1000 rpm.
  2. Room temperature of about 24 degrees.

Testing procedure:

To do proper tests and compare both models I’ve decided to:

  1. Test 1: Remove the 2 x intake SilverStone AP181 fans on the bottom panel from my case and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)
  2. Test 2: Install to the case the 2 x intake SilverStone AP181 fans on the bottom panel, set them working at low speed mode (700 rpm) and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)
  3. Test 3: Set the 2 x intake SilverStone AP181 fans installed on the bottom panel at high speed mode (1200 rpm) and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)
  4. Test 4: Install in the case the 2 x intake SilverStone AP182 fans on the bottom panel, set them working at low speed mode (500rpm) and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)
  5. Test 5: Set the 2 x intake SilverStone AP182 fans installed on the bottom panel at high speed mode (2000rpm) and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)

And this is what both fans look like together:

IMG_8256

Now let’s check out the test results:

Test 1: Remove the 2 x intake SilverStone AP181 fans on the bottom panel from my case and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)

IMG_8261

FX-8350 @ 4020 no fans FX-8350 @ 4420 no fans
1 FX-8350 @ 4020 no fans 2 FX-8350 @ 4420 no fans

 
Test 2: Install to the case the 2 x intake SilverStone AP181 fans on the bottom panel, set them working at low speed mode (700 rpm) and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)

Test 3: Set the 2 x intake SilverStone AP181 fans installed on the bottom panel at high speed mode (1200 rpm) and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)

IMG_8265 IMG_8266
FX-8350 @ 4020 2 x AP181 LOW  FX-8350 @ 4420 2 x AP181 LOW 
3 FX-8350 @ 4020 2 x AP181 LOW 5 FX-8350 @ 4420 2 x AP181 LOW
FX-8350 @ 4020 2 x AP181 HIGH  FX-8350 @ 4420 2 x AP181 HIGH 
4 FX-8350 @ 4020 2 x AP181 HIGH 6 FX-8350 @ 4420 2 x AP181 HIGH

 
Test 4: Install in the case the 2 x intake SilverStone AP182 fans on the bottom panel, set them working at low speed mode (500rpm) and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)

Test 5: Set the 2 x intake SilverStone AP182 fans installed on the bottom panel at high speed mode (2000rpm) and do processor stress test at standard frequency of 4.020 GHz (at 1.356V) and at medium overclock frequency of 4.420 GHz (at 1.416V)

IMG_8269 IMG_8270
FX-8350 @ 4020 2 x AP182 LOW FX-8350 @ 4420 2 x AP182 LOW
7 FX-8350 @ 4020 2 x AP182 LOW 9 FX-8350 @ 4420 2 x AP182 LOW
FX-8350 @ 4020 2 x AP182 HIGH FX-8350 @ 4420 2 x AP182 HIGH
8 FX-8350 @ 4020 2 x AP182 HIGH 10 FX-8350 @ 4420 2 x AP182 HIGH

 
All of the test results have been summed up in the following charts:

SilverStone AP182 Per

And the fans speed during the tests:

SilverStone AP182 Sil

Conclusions:

1. SilverStone AP182 performance:

For the last few years all hardware manufacturers started announcing all kinds of really well-performing and power hungry products, which used in any modern computer case should rely on good cooling products to provide nice, cool, quiet and stable performance. And to achieve such cooling capabilities, back in 2010 SilverStone announced their especially designed for case cooling fan series called Air Penetrator, which I’ve already experienced with several tests, which I’ve done in the past.

When I got the two AP182 test samples I thought it will be nice to do direct comparison tests so I can check how they perform in real conditions versus the older AP181 model and all I can say is that I am really impressed. If you take a deeper look to the pictures with the tests results you will notice the real temperature differences between the hardware running inside the case without fans, with the fans working at low speed and with the fans working at high speed.

To be honest, before I started testing I was expecting that AP182 will perform just a little bit better than AP181 but when the final results were summed up I was amazed. The newer model offers much bigger revolutions per minute range, with much better airflow level, much bigger static pressure level and overall better options to control and set the fan to operate at the best performance/noise level. And by saying noise, I should point out that when the fan is operating up to 1000-1200 revolutions per minute it is actually a quiet product, but above that speed it gets really noisy. Anyway, seems that SilverStone thought about that and included in the package the additional fan controller to assist the regular users to set the best performance/silence balance so their computer can run nice and steady and for people who enjoy reaching maximum overclock frequencies without putting their hardware and performance at risk. I believe in both cases, this model is one really good choice.

2. SilverStone AP182 appearance:

After I had some fun with the SilverStone AP182 I can say it is one massive and good looking fan, which creates the feeling for a safe and reliable operation in any modern case. Unfortunately, I can’t really say that the white colour is actually the best choice for a case fan, because 90% of the modern cases on the market are painted in black, however if this fan is installed in a white case or modding project it will definitely be an overkill as major cooling unit for the whole system and as a good looking part for the build.

I think SilverStone AP182 deserves the following reward:

 Best-Perf-Visual

 
Official price (MSRP) for  SilverStone AP182 unknown

Official warranty: 24 months

I thank Silverstone for the test sample.

Dobrin Krastev is the owner, reviewer and newsman of www.DVTests.com with more than 15 years' experience in personal computers, server and storage systems, UPS, peripheral devices and software. Passionate about testing and reviewing, AMD overclocking using AM3 990FXA and AMD FM2 A85X test systems and building modding projects.
4 Comments
  1. Reply Boskorp 10.08.2013 at 22:17

    I like’em all, especially the design in such a simple thing as a fan. Nice innovations in look and performance, 10x for the review, I knew about Silverstone from this site about an year ago and they keep the pace.

  2. Reply Kenneth Verbeure 08.08.2013 at 9:23

    Very nice and detailed review, as are all of your reviews. Very readable stuff 😀
    Looking forward to the next one

  3. Reply Nikola Milanov 04.08.2013 at 13:10

    As owner of one AP181 I can say it has quite an impressive airflow. Nice review of the white brother, looking forward to getting one these 😛

  4. Reply Dimcho 02.08.2013 at 10:59

    Good job.
    Complete and detailed review of very-nice-looking fans, and also – with “cool” performance 🙂
    Keep up the good work.

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